The Embankment

By T. E. Hulme 1883–1917

(The fantasia of a fallen gentleman on a cold, bitter night.)

Once, in finesse of fiddles found I ecstasy,
In the flash of gold heels on the hard pavement.
Now see I
That warmth’s the very stuff of poesy.
Oh, God, make small
The old star-eaten blanket of the sky,
That I may fold it round me and in comfort lie.

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Poet T. E. Hulme 1883–1917

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Imagist

Subjects Nature, Religion, Stars, Planets, Heavens, God & the Divine

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Imagist

Biography

Though not as prolific as several of his contemporaries, T. E. Hulme's influence in shaping twentieth-century thought in art and literature is indisputable. As one Nation writer noted in his review of Hulme's posthumous work Speculations, "Although he considered himself an amateur in speculation, he was positive, original, and acute; and it would be difficult to say how much was lost to thought when he died at Nieuport in . . .

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Poems by T. E. Hulme

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Religion, Stars, Planets, Heavens, God & the Divine

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Imagist

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Imagist

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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