On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again

By John Keats 1795–1821 John Keats
O golden-tongued Romance with serene lute!
   Fair plumed Syren! Queen of far away!
   Leave melodizing on this wintry day,
Shut up thine olden pages, and be mute:
Adieu! for once again the fierce dispute,
   Betwixt damnation and impassion'd clay
   Must I burn through; once more humbly assay
The bitter-sweet of this Shakespearian fruit.
Chief Poet! and ye clouds of Albion,
   Begetters of our deep eternal theme,
When through the old oak forest I am gone,
   Let me not wander in a barren dream,
But when I am consumed in the fire,
Give me new Phoenix wings to fly at my desire.

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Poet John Keats 1795–1821

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects Reading & Books, Arts & Sciences, Growing Old, Living, Health & Illness, Music, Mythology & Folklore, The Mind

Poetic Terms Sonnet, Allusion

 John  Keats

Biography

John Keats, who died at the age of twenty-five, had perhaps the most remarkable career of any English poet. He published only fifty-four poems, in three slim volumes and a few magazines. But at each point in his development he took on the challenges of a wide range of poetic forms from the sonnet, to the Spenserian romance, to the Miltonic epic, defining anew their possibilities with his own distinctive fusion of earnest energy, . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Reading & Books, Arts & Sciences, Growing Old, Living, Health & Illness, Music, Mythology & Folklore, The Mind

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Poetic Terms Sonnet, Allusion

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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