To Homer

By John Keats 1795–1821 John Keats
Standing aloof in giant ignorance,
   Of thee I hear and of the Cyclades,
As one who sits ashore and longs perchance
   To visit dolphin-coral in deep seas.
So thou wast blind;—but then the veil was rent,
   For Jove uncurtain'd Heaven to let thee live,
And Neptune made for thee a spumy tent,
   And Pan made sing for thee his forest-hive;
Aye on the shores of darkness there is light,
   And precipices show untrodden green,
There is a budding morrow in midnight,
   There is a triple sight in blindness keen;
Such seeing hadst thou, as it once befel
To Dian, Queen of Earth, and Heaven, and Hell.

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Poet John Keats 1795–1821

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects Arts & Sciences, Mythology & Folklore, Music, Heroes & Patriotism, Poetry & Poets, Greek & Roman Mythology

Poetic Terms Sonnet, Allusion

 John  Keats

Biography

John Keats, who died at the age of twenty-five, had perhaps the most remarkable career of any English poet. He published only fifty-four poems, in three slim volumes and a few magazines. But at each point in his development he took on the challenges of a wide range of poetic forms from the sonnet, to the Spenserian romance, to the Miltonic epic, defining anew their possibilities with his own distinctive fusion of earnest energy, . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Arts & Sciences, Mythology & Folklore, Music, Heroes & Patriotism, Poetry & Poets, Greek & Roman Mythology

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Poetic Terms Sonnet, Allusion

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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