The Bride

By D. H. Lawrence 1885–1930
My love looks like a girl to-night,
      But she is old.
The plaits that lie along her pillow
      Are not gold,
But threaded with filigree silver,
      And uncanny cold.

She looks like a young maiden, since her brow
      Is smooth and fair,
Her cheeks are very smooth, her eyes are closed.
      She sleeps a rare
Still winsome sleep, so still, and so composed.

Nay, but she sleeps like a bride, and dreams her dreams
      Of perfect things.
She lies at last, the darling, in the shape of her dream,
      And her dead mouth sings
By its shape, like the thrushes in clear evenings.

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Poet D. H. Lawrence 1885–1930

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Subjects Marriage & Companionship, Horror, Love, Living, Relationships, Mythology & Folklore, Romantic Love, Heartache & Loss

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 D. H. Lawrence

Biography

English writer D.H. Lawrence’s prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, and literary criticism. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitality, spontaneity, human sexuality and instinct. After a brief . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Marriage & Companionship, Horror, Love, Living, Relationships, Mythology & Folklore, Romantic Love, Heartache & Loss

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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