Shakespeare

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 1807–1882 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
A vision as of crowded city streets,
      With human life in endless overflow;
      Thunder of thoroughfares; trumpets that blow
      To battle; clamor, in obscure retreats,
Of sailors landed from their anchored fleets;
      Tolling of bells in turrets, and below
      Voices of children, and bright flowers that throw
      O'er garden-walls their intermingled sweets!
This vision comes to me when I unfold
      The volume of the Poet paramount,
      Whom all the Muses loved, not one alone; —
Into his hands they put the lyre of gold,
      And, crowned with sacred laurel at their fount,
      Placed him as Musagetes on their throne.

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Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 1807–1882

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Arts & Sciences, Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries, Poetry & Poets

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 Henry Wadsworth  Longfellow

Biography

By far the most widely known and best-loved American poet of his time, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow achieved a level of national and international prominence possibly unequaled in the literary history of the United States. Poems such as "Paul Revere's Ride," Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie (1847), and "A Psalm of Life" became mainstays of national culture, long remembered by generations of readers who studied them in school. . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Arts & Sciences, Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries, Poetry & Poets

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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