Sonnet 18: Avenge, O Lord, thy slaughter'd saints, whose bones

By John Milton 1608–1674 John Milton

On the Late Massacre in Piedmont

Avenge, O Lord, thy slaughter'd saints, whose bones
       Lie scatter'd on the Alpine mountains cold,
       Ev'n them who kept thy truth so pure of old,
       When all our fathers worshipp'd stocks and stones;
Forget not: in thy book record their groans
       Who were thy sheep and in their ancient fold
       Slain by the bloody Piemontese that roll'd
       Mother with infant down the rocks. Their moans
The vales redoubl'd to the hills, and they
       To Heav'n. Their martyr'd blood and ashes sow
       O'er all th' Italian fields where still doth sway
The triple tyrant; that from these may grow
       A hundred-fold, who having learnt thy way
Early may fly the Babylonian woe.

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Poet John Milton 1608–1674

POET’S REGION England

Subjects History & Politics, Religion, War & Conflict, Social Commentaries, Christianity

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 John  Milton

Biography

John Milton’s career as a writer of prose and poetry spans three distinct eras: Stuart England; the Civil War (1642-1648) and Interregnum, including the Commonwealth (1649-1653) and Protectorate (1654-1660); and the Restoration. When Elizabeth I, the so-called Virgin Queen and the last of the Tudors, died, James VI, King of Scots, was enthroned as Britain’s king. Titled James I, he inaugurated the House of Stuart. His son and . . .

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SUBJECT History & Politics, Religion, War & Conflict, Social Commentaries, Christianity

POET’S REGION England

Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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