A Daughter of Eve

By Christina Rossetti 1830–1894 Christina Rossetti
A fool I was to sleep at noon,
         And wake when night is chilly
Beneath the comfortless cold moon;
A fool to pluck my rose too soon,
         A fool to snap my lily.

My garden-plot I have not kept;
         Faded and all-forsaken,
I weep as I have never wept:
Oh it was summer when I slept,
         It's winter now I waken.

Talk what you please of future spring
         And sun-warm'd sweet to-morrow:—
Stripp'd bare of hope and everything,
No more to laugh, no more to sing,
         I sit alone with sorrow.

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Poet Christina Rossetti 1830–1894

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Living, Disappointment & Failure, Sorrow & Grieving

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Metaphor

 Christina  Rossetti

Biography

Of all Victorian women poets, posterity has been kindest to Christina Rossetti. Her poetry has never disappeared from view, and her reputation, though it suffered a decline in the first half of the twentieth century, has always been preserved to some degree. Critical interest in Rossetti’s poetry swelled in the final decades of the twentieth century, a resurgence largely impelled by the emergence of feminist criticism; much of . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure, Sorrow & Grieving

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Metaphor

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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