Dream Land

By Christina Rossetti 1830–1894 Christina Rossetti
Where sunless rivers weep
Their waves into the deep,
She sleeps a charmed sleep:
         Awake her not.
Led by a single star,
She came from very far
To seek where shadows are
         Her pleasant lot.

She left the rosy morn,
She left the fields of corn,
For twilight cold and lorn
         And water springs.
Through sleep, as through a veil,
She sees the sky look pale,
And hears the nightingale
         That sadly sings.

Rest, rest, a perfect rest
Shed over brow and breast;
Her face is toward the west,
         The purple land.
She cannot see the grain
Ripening on hill and plain;
She cannot feel the rain
         Upon her hand.

Rest, rest, for evermore
Upon a mossy shore;
Rest, rest at the heart's core
         Till time shall cease:
Sleep that no pain shall wake;
Night that no morn shall break
Till joy shall overtake
         Her perfect peace.

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Poet Christina Rossetti 1830–1894

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Nature, Arts & Sciences, Philosophy, Landscapes & Pastorals

Occasions Funerals

Poetic Terms Simile, Rhymed Stanza

 Christina  Rossetti

Biography

Of all Victorian women poets, posterity has been kindest to Christina Rossetti. Her poetry has never disappeared from view, and her reputation, though it suffered a decline in the first half of the twentieth century, has always been preserved to some degree. Critical interest in Rossetti’s poetry swelled in the final decades of the twentieth century, a resurgence largely impelled by the emergence of feminist criticism; much of . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Arts & Sciences, Philosophy, Landscapes & Pastorals

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Simile, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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