Proud Maisie

By Sir Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott
Proud Maisie is in the wood,
   Walking so early;
Sweet Robin sits on the bush,
   Singing so rarely.

"Tell me, thou bonny bird,
   When shall I marry me?"—
"When six braw gentlemen
   Kirkward shall carry ye."

"Who makes the bridal bed,
   Birdie, say truly?"—
"The gray-headed sexton
   That delves the grave duly.

"The glowworm o'er grave and stone
   Shall light thee steady;
The owl from the steeple sing,
   'Welcome, proud lady.'"

Source: The Longman Anthology of Poetry (2006)

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Poet Sir Walter Scott

POET’S REGION Scotland

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects Living, Horror, Death, Mythology & Folklore

 Sir Walter  Scott

Biography

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, Sir Walter Scott followed his family’s tradition and went into law; his heart, however, was with history and literature. He became an instant best seller with historical narrative poems like “The Lay of the Last Minstrel” and “The Lady of the Lake.” When the popularity of his poetry began to wane, Scott turned to writing historical novels, which were immensely successful.

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Horror, Death, Mythology & Folklore

POET’S REGION Scotland

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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