The Emperor of Ice-Cream

By Wallace Stevens 1879–1955 Wallace Stevens
Call the roller of big cigars,
The muscular one, and bid him whip
In kitchen cups concupiscent curds.
Let the wenches dawdle in such dress
As they are used to wear, and let the boys
Bring flowers in last month's newspapers.
Let be be finale of seem.
The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.

Take from the dresser of deal,
Lacking the three glass knobs, that sheet
On which she embroidered fantails once
And spread it so as to cover her face.
If her horny feet protrude, they come
To show how cold she is, and dumb.
Let the lamp affix its beam.
The only emperor is the emperor of ice-cream.

Source: The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens (1982)

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Poet Wallace Stevens 1879–1955

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Subjects Eating & Drinking, Activities, Arts & Sciences, Language & Linguistics

 Wallace  Stevens

Biography

Wallace Stevens is one of America's most respected poets. He was a master stylist, employing an extraordinary vocabulary and a rigorous precision in crafting his poems. But he was also a philosopher of aesthetics, vigorously exploring the notion of poetry as the supreme fusion of the creative imagination and objective reality. Because of the extreme technical and thematic complexity of his work, Stevens was sometimes considered . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Eating & Drinking, Activities, Arts & Sciences, Language & Linguistics

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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