The Snow Man

By Wallace Stevens 1879–1955 Wallace Stevens
One must have a mind of winter
To regard the frost and the boughs
Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;

And have been cold a long time
To behold the junipers shagged with ice,
The spruces rough in the distant glitter

Of the January sun; and not to think
Of any misery in the sound of the wind,
In the sound of a few leaves,

Which is the sound of the land
Full of the same wind
That is blowing in the same bare place

For the listener, who listens in the snow,
And, nothing himself, beholds
Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.

Source: Poetry magazine (1921)

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Poet Wallace Stevens 1879–1955

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Subjects Nature, Winter, Arts & Sciences, Trees & Flowers, Philosophy, Language & Linguistics, Living, The Mind

 Wallace  Stevens

Biography

Wallace Stevens is one of America's most respected poets. He was a master stylist, employing an extraordinary vocabulary and a rigorous precision in crafting his poems. But he was also a philosopher of aesthetics, vigorously exploring the notion of poetry as the supreme fusion of the creative imagination and objective reality. Because of the extreme technical and thematic complexity of his work, Stevens was sometimes considered . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Winter, Arts & Sciences, Trees & Flowers, Philosophy, Language & Linguistics, Living, The Mind

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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