Song: I prithee spare me gentle boy

By Sir John Suckling 1609–1642 Sir John Suckling
I prithee spare me gentle boy,
Press me no more for that slight toy,
That foolish trifle of an heart;
I swear it will not do its part,
Though thou dost thine, employ’st thy pow’r and art.

For through long custom it has known
The little secrets, and is grown
Sullen and wise, will have its will,
And like old hawks pursues that still
That makes least sport, flies only where’t can kill.

Some youth that has not made his story,
Will think perchance the pain’s the glory,
And mannerly sit out love’s feast;
I shall be carving of the best,
Rudely call for the last course ’fore the rest.

And oh when once that course is past,
How short a time the feast doth last;
Men rise away and scarce say grace,
Or civilly once thank the face
That did invite, but seek another place.

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Poet Sir John Suckling 1609–1642

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Subjects Relationships, Living, Coming of Age, Love, Realistic & Complicated

Holidays Valentine's Day

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Sir John  Suckling

Biography

A popular label for many poets in seventeenth-century Britain has been "Cavalier," and the person who usually comes first to mind is Sir John Suckling. The classification implies an allegiance to Charles I in his political and military battles against various Parliamentarian or religious groups during the later 1620s through his execution on 30 January 1649. Included thus are the poets Thomas Carew, Richard Lovelace, Suckling, . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Living, Coming of Age, Love, Realistic & Complicated

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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