Sonnet 1: Dost see how unregarded now

By Sir John Suckling 1609–1642 Sir John Suckling
Dost see how unregarded now
            That piece of beauty passes?
There was a time when I did vow
            To that alone;
      But mark the fate of faces;
The red and white works now no more on me
Than if it could not charm, or I not see.

And yet the face continues good,
            And I have still desires,
Am still the selfsame flesh and blood,
            As apt to melt
      And suffer from those fires;
Oh some kind pow’r unriddle where it lies,
Whether my heart be faulty, or her eyes?

She ev’ry day her man does kill,
            And I as often die;
Neither her power then, nor my will
            Can question’d be.
      What is the mystery?
Sure beauty’s empires, like to greater states,
Have certain periods set, and hidden fates.

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Poet Sir John Suckling 1609–1642

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Subjects Relationships, Love, Men & Women, Desire, Infatuation & Crushes, Unrequited Love, Realistic & Complicated

Poetic Terms Sonnet, Rhymed Stanza

 Sir John  Suckling

Biography

A popular label for many poets in seventeenth-century Britain has been "Cavalier," and the person who usually comes first to mind is Sir John Suckling. The classification implies an allegiance to Charles I in his political and military battles against various Parliamentarian or religious groups during the later 1620s through his execution on 30 January 1649. Included thus are the poets Thomas Carew, Richard Lovelace, Suckling, . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Love, Men & Women, Desire, Infatuation & Crushes, Unrequited Love, Realistic & Complicated

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Poetic Terms Sonnet, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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