In Memoriam A. H. H. OBIIT MDCCCXXXIII: 105

By Alfred, Lord Tennyson 1809–1892 Alfred, Lord Tennyson
To-night ungather'd let us leave
         This laurel, let this holly stand:
         We live within the stranger's land,
And strangely falls our Christmas-eve.

Our father's dust is left alone
         And silent under other snows:
         There in due time the woodbine blows,
The violet comes, but we are gone.

No more shall wayward grief abuse
         The genial hour with mask and mime;
         For change of place, like growth of time,
Has broke the bond of dying use.

Let cares that petty shadows cast,
         By which our lives are chiefly proved,
         A little spare the night I loved,
And hold it solemn to the past.

But let no footstep beat the floor,
         Nor bowl of wassail mantle warm;
         For who would keep an ancient form
Thro' which the spirit breathes no more?

Be neither song, nor game, nor feast;
         Nor harp be touch'd, nor flute be blown;
         No dance, no motion, save alone
What lightens in the lucid east

Of rising worlds by yonder wood.
         Long sleeps the summer in the seed;
         Run out your measured arcs, and lead
The closing cycle rich in good.

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Poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson 1809–1892

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Living, Sorrow & Grieving, Death

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Series/Sequence

 Alfred, Lord  Tennyson

Biography

More than any other Victorian writer, Tennyson has seemed the embodiment of his age, both to his contemporaries and to modern readers. In his own day he was said to be—with Queen Victoria and Gladstone—one of the three most famous living persons, a reputation no other poet writing in English has ever had. As official poetic spokesman for the reign of Victoria, he felt called upon to celebrate a quickly changing industrial and . . .

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Poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Sorrow & Grieving, Death

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Series/Sequence

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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