In Memoriam A. H. H. OBIIT MDCCCXXXIII: 116

By Alfred, Lord Tennyson 1809–1892 Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Is it, then, regret for buried time
         That keenlier in sweet April wakes,
         And meets the year, and gives and takes
The colours of the crescent prime?

Not all: the songs, the stirring air,
         The life re-orient out of dust,
         Cry thro' the sense to hearten trust
In that which made the world so fair.

Not all regret: the face will shine
         Upon me, while I muse alone;
         And that dear voice, I once have known,
Still speak to me of me and mine:

Yet less of sorrow lives in me
         For days of happy commune dead;
         Less yearning for the friendship fled,
Than some strong bond which is to be.

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Poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson 1809–1892

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Spring, Friends & Enemies, Living, Nature, Relationships, Sorrow & Grieving

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Series/Sequence

 Alfred, Lord  Tennyson

Biography

More than any other Victorian writer, Tennyson has seemed the embodiment of his age, both to his contemporaries and to modern readers. In his own day he was said to be—with Queen Victoria and Gladstone—one of the three most famous living persons, a reputation no other poet writing in English has ever had. As official poetic spokesman for the reign of Victoria, he felt called upon to celebrate a quickly changing industrial and . . .

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Poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Spring, Friends & Enemies, Living, Nature, Relationships, Sorrow & Grieving

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Series/Sequence

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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