Madam, withouten many Words

By Sir Thomas Wyatt 1503–1542 Thomas Wyatt

Madam, withouten many words
    Once I am sure ye will or no ...
And if ye will, then leave your bourds
    And use your wit and show it so,
And with a beck ye shall me call;
    And if of one that burneth alway
Ye have any pity at all,
    Answer him fair with & {.} or nay.
If it be &, {.} I shall be fain;
    If it be nay, friends as before;
Ye shall another man obtain,
    And I mine own and yours no more.

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Poet Sir Thomas Wyatt 1503–1542

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Renaissance

Subjects Relationships, Love, Men & Women, Realistic & Complicated

Occasions Engagement

Sir  Thomas  Wyatt

Biography

Born in Kent, England, Sir Thomas Wyatt was an ambassador to France and Italy for King Henry VIII. Wyatt’s travels abroad exposed him to different forms of poetry, which he adapted for the English language — most notably, the sonnet. Rumored to be Anne Boleyn’s lover, he spent a month in the Tower of London until Boleyn’s execution for adultery. Many consider his poem “Whoso List to Hunt” to be about . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Love, Men & Women, Realistic & Complicated

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Renaissance

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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