Crossing 16

By Rabindranath Tagore 1861–1941 Rabindranath Tagore

You came to my door in the dawn and sang; it angered me to be awakened from sleep, and you went away unheeded.
You came in the noon and asked for water; it vexed me in my work, and you were sent away with reproaches.
You came in the evening with your flaming torches.
You seemed to me like a terror and I shut my door.
Now in the midnight I sit alone in my lampless room and call you back whom I turned away in insult.

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Poet Rabindranath Tagore 1861–1941

POET’S REGION Asia, South

Occasions Gratitude & Apologies

Poetic Terms Free Verse

 Rabindranath  Tagore

Biography

A native of Calcutta, India, who wrote in Bengali and often translated his own work into English, Rabindranath Tagore won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913 — the first Asian to receive the honor. He wrote poetry, fiction, drama, essays, and songs; promoted reforms in education, aesthetics and religion; and in his late sixties he even turned to the visual arts, producing 2,500 paintings and drawings before his death.

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POET’S REGION Asia, South

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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