Fruit-gathering LV

By Rabindranath Tagore 1861–1941 Rabindranath Tagore

Tulsidas, the poet, was wandering, deep in thought, by the Ganges, in that lonely spot where they burn their dead.
He found a woman sitting at the feet of the corpse of her dead husband, gaily dressed as for a wedding.
She rose as she saw him, bowed to him, and said, "Permit me, Master, with your blessing, to follow my husband to heaven."
"Why such hurry, my daughter?" asked Tulsidas. "Is not this earth also His who made heaven?"
"For heaven I do not long," said the woman. "I want my husband."
Tulsidas smiled and said to her, "Go back to your home, my child. Before the month is over you will find your husband."
The woman went back with glad hope. Tulsidas came to her every day and gave her high thoughts to think, till her heart was filled to the brim with divine love.
When the month was scarcely over, her neighbours came to her, asking, "Woman, have you found your husband?"
The widow smiled and said, "I have."
Eagerly they asked, "Where is he?"
"In my heart is my lord, one with me," said the woman.

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Poet Rabindranath Tagore 1861–1941

POET’S REGION Asia, South

Subjects Religion, Living, Love, Poetry & Poets, Marriage & Companionship, Other Religions, Arts & Sciences, Relationships, Death, Infatuation & Crushes, Heartache & Loss

Poetic Terms Free Verse

 Rabindranath  Tagore

Biography

A native of Calcutta, India, who wrote in Bengali and often translated his own work into English, Rabindranath Tagore won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913 — the first Asian to receive the honor. He wrote poetry, fiction, drama, essays, and songs; promoted reforms in education, aesthetics and religion; and in his late sixties he even turned to the visual arts, producing 2,500 paintings and drawings before his death.

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Religion, Living, Love, Poetry & Poets, Marriage & Companionship, Other Religions, Arts & Sciences, Relationships, Death, Infatuation & Crushes, Heartache & Loss

POET’S REGION Asia, South

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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