The Affliction of Richard

By Robert Bridges 1844–1930 Robert Bridges
      Love not too much. But how,
When thou hast made me such,
And dost thy gifts bestow,
How can I love too much?
      Though I must fear to lose,
And drown my joy in care,
With all its thorns I choose
The path of love and prayer.

      Though thou, I know not why,
Didst kill my childish trust,
That breach with toil did I
Repair, because I must:
      And spite of frighting schemes,
With which the fiends of Hell
Blaspheme thee in my dreams,
So far I have hoped well.

      But what the heavenly key,
What marvel in me wrought
Shall quite exculpate thee,
I have no shadow of thought.
      What am I that complain?
The love, from which began
My question sad and vain,
Justifies thee to man.

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Poet Robert Bridges 1844–1930

POET’S REGION England

Subjects Love, Disappointment & Failure, Living, Religion, Relationships, Faith & Doubt, Infatuation & Crushes

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Robert  Bridges

Biography

A Victorian who by choice remained apart from the aesthetic movements of his day, Robert Bridges was a classicist. His experimentation with eighteenth-century classical forms culminated in The Testament of Beauty, generally acknowledged as his masterpiece. He succeeded Alfred Austin as Poet Laureate in 1913 and was active in the Society for Pure English, which was founded largely through his efforts. He had an important . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Love, Disappointment & Failure, Living, Religion, Relationships, Faith & Doubt, Infatuation & Crushes

POET’S REGION England

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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