The Old Maid

By Sara Teasdale 1884–1933 Sara Teasdale
I saw her in a Broadway car,
      The woman I might grow to be;
I felt my lover look at her
      And then turn suddenly to me.

Her hair was dull and drew no light
      And yet its color was as mine;
Her eyes were strangely like my eyes
      Tho' love had never made them shine.

Her body was a thing grown thin,
      Hungry for love that never came;
Her soul was frozen in the dark
      Unwarmed forever by love's flame.

I felt my lover look at her
      And then turn suddenly to me, —
His eyes were magic to defy
      The woman I shall never be.

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Poet Sara Teasdale 1884–1933

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Subjects Living, Disappointment & Failure, Cities & Urban Life, Love, Social Commentaries, Growing Old, Relationships, Men & Women, Desire, Heartache & Loss

Poetic Terms Common Measure, Rhymed Stanza

 Sara  Teasdale

Biography

Sara Teasdale received public admiration for her well-crafted lyrical poetry which centered on a woman's changing perspectives on beauty, love, and death. Many of Teasdale's poems chart developments in her own life, from her experiences as a sheltered young woman in St. Louis, to those as a successful yet increasingly uneasy writer in New York City, to a depressed and disillusioned person who would commit suicide in 1933. . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure, Cities & Urban Life, Love, Social Commentaries, Growing Old, Relationships, Men & Women, Desire, Heartache & Loss

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Poetic Terms Common Measure, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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