Song

By Robert Browning 1812–1889 Robert Browning
Nay but you, who do not love her,
       Is she not pure gold, my mistress?
Holds earth aught—speak truth—above her?
       Aught like this tress, see, and this tress,
And this last fairest tress of all,
So fair, see, ere I let it fall?

Because, you spend your lives in praising;
       To praise, you search the wide world over:
Then why not witness, calmly gazing,
       If earth holds aught—speak truth—above her?
Above this tress, and this, I touch
But cannot praise, I love so much!

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Poet Robert Browning 1812–1889

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Relationships, Love, Romantic Love, Infatuation & Crushes

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Robert  Browning

Biography

Although the early part of Robert Browning’s creative life was spent in comparative obscurity, he has come to be regarded as one of the most important poets of the Victorian period. His dramatic monologues and the psycho-historical epic The Ring and the Book (1868-1869), a novel in verse, have established him as a major figure in the history of English poetry. His claim to attention as a children’s writer is more modest, resting . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Love, Romantic Love, Infatuation & Crushes

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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