Ode on Solitude

By Alexander Pope 1688–1744 Alexander Pope
Happy the man, whose wish and care
   A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
                            In his own ground.

Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread,
   Whose flocks supply him with attire,
Whose trees in summer yield him shade,
                            In winter fire.

Blest, who can unconcernedly find
   Hours, days, and years slide soft away,
In health of body, peace of mind,
                            Quiet by day,

Sound sleep by night; study and ease,
   Together mixed; sweet recreation;
And innocence, which most does please,
                            With meditation.

Thus let me live, unseen, unknown;
   Thus unlamented let me die;
Steal from the world, and not a stone
                            Tell where I lie.

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Poet Alexander Pope 1688–1744

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Augustan

Subjects Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries

Poetic Terms Ode

 Alexander  Pope

Biography

Alexander Pope was born in London to a Roman Catholic family. A childhood sickness left him with stunted height, a curved spine, and ill health for the rest of his life. Pope earned fame and great financial success as a poet, satirist, and translator. He is perhaps best remembered for his mastery of the heroic couplet, as in An Essay on Man and “The Rape of the Lock.”

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Augustan

Poetic Terms Ode

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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