Wildflowers

By Reginald Gibbons b. 1947 Reginald Gibbons
Coleridge carefully wrote down a whole page   
of them, all beginning with the letter b.   
Guidebooks preserve our knowledge
of their hues and shapes, their breeding.
Many poems have made delicate word-chimes—
like wind-chimes not for wind but for the breath of man—
out of their lovely names.
At the edge of the prairie in a cabin
when thunder comes closer to thump the roof hard   
a few of them—in a corner, brittle in a dry jar   
where a woman’s thoughtful hand left them to fade—
seem to blow with the announcing winds outside   
as the rain begins to fall on all their supple kin
of all colors, under a sky of one color, or none.

Reginald Gibbons, “Wildflowers” from Saints (New York: Persea Books, 1986). Copyright © 1986 by Reginald Gibbons. Reprinted with the permission of the author.

Source: Saints (Persea Books, 1986)

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Poet Reginald Gibbons b. 1947

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

Subjects Nature, Trees & Flowers

Poetic Terms Free Verse

 Reginald  Gibbons

Biography

Born and raised in Houston, Reginald Gibbons earned his BA in Spanish and Portuguese from Princeton University, and both his MA in English and creative writing and his PhD in comparative literature from Stanford University.

Gibbons is the author of more than half a dozen collections of poetry, including Sparrow: New and Selected Poems (1997), winner of the Balcones Poetry Prize, and Creatures of a Day (2008), finalist for the . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Trees & Flowers

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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