The Worm

By Ralph Bergengren 1871–1947 Ralph Bergengren
When the earth is turned in spring
The worms are fat as anything.

And birds come flying all around
To eat the worms right off the ground.

They like the worms just as much as I
Like bread and milk and apple pie.

And once, when I was very young,
I put a worm right on my tongue.

I didn't like the taste a bit,
And so I didn't swallow it.

But oh, it makes my Mother squirm
Because she thinks I ate that worm!

Source: The Random House Book of Poetry for Children (1983)

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Poet Ralph Bergengren 1871–1947

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Living, Infancy, Youth, Relationships, Home Life, Family & Ancestors, Activities, Eating & Drinking

Biography

Early 20th-century essayist, humorist, critic, and children’s poet Ralph Wilhelm Bergengren was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts. In 1900, he married the writer Anna Farquhar and settled with her in Boston.
 
Bergengren’s poetry for children, often written in a youthful voice, uses rhyme and meter to achieve complex yet memorable light verse. His numerous books include Comforts of Home (1918), The Perfect Gentleman (1919), The . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Infancy, Youth, Relationships, Home Life, Family & Ancestors, Activities, Eating & Drinking

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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