Along with Youth

By Ernest M. Hemingway 1899–1961
A porcupine skin,
Stiff with bad tanning,
It must have ended somewhere.
Stuffed horned owl
Pompous
Yellow eyed;
Chuck-wills-widow on a biassed twig
Sooted with dust.
Piles of old magazines,
Drawers of boy’s letters
And the line of love
They must have ended somewhere.
Yesterday’s Tribune is gone
Along with youth
And the canoe that went to pieces on the beach
The year of the big storm
When the hotel burned down
At Seney, Michigan.

Discover this poem’s context and related poetry, articles, and media.

Poet Ernest M. Hemingway 1899–1961

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Subjects Living, Time & Brevity, Youth

Poetic Terms Free Verse

 Ernest M. Hemingway

Biography

"The writer's job is to tell the truth," Ernest Hemingway once said. When he was having difficulty writing he reminded himself of this, as he explained in his memoirs, A Moveable Feast. "I would stand and look out over the roofs of Paris and think, 'Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.' So finally I would write . . .

Continue reading this biography

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Time & Brevity, Youth

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Poetic Terms Free Verse

Report a problem with this poem

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

This poem has related video.

This poem has related audio.