1914 IV. The Dead

By Rupert Brooke 1887–1915 Rupert Brooke
These hearts were woven of human joys and cares,
      Washed marvellously with sorrow, swift to mirth.
The years had given them kindness. Dawn was theirs,
      And sunset, and the colours of the earth.
These had seen movement, and heard music; known
      Slumber and waking; loved; gone proudly friended;
Felt the quick stir of wonder; sat alone;
      Touched flowers and furs and cheeks. All this is ended.

There are waters blown by changing winds to laughter
And lit by the rich skies, all day. And after,
      Frost, with a gesture, stays the waves that dance
And wandering loveliness. He leaves a white
      Unbroken glory, a gathered radiance,
A width, a shining peace, under the night.

Source: The Collected Poems of Rupert Brooke (1915)

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Poet Rupert Brooke 1887–1915

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Georgian

Subjects Living, Social Commentaries, Time & Brevity, War & Conflict, Death

Holidays Memorial Day

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 Rupert  Brooke

Biography

Few writers have provoked as much excessive praise and scornful condemnation as English poet Rupert Brooke. Handsome, charming, and talented, Brooke was a national hero even before his death in 1915 at the age of twenty-seven. His poetry, with its unabashed patriotism and graceful lyricism, was revered in a country that was yet to feel the devastating effects of two world wars. Brooke's early death only solidified his image as . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Social Commentaries, Time & Brevity, War & Conflict, Death

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Georgian

Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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