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By Trumbull Stickney 1874–1904 Trumbull Stickney
By such an all-embalming summer day
As sweetens now among the mountain pines
Down to the cornland yonder and the vines,
To where the sky and sea are mixed in gray,
How do all things together take their way
Harmonious to the harvest, bringing wines
And bread and light and whatsoe’er combines
In the large wreath to make it round and gay.
To me my troubled life doth now appear
Like scarce distinguishable summits hung
Around the blue horizon: places where
Not even a traveller purposeth to steer,—
Whereof a migrant bird in passing sung,
And the girl closed her window not to hear.

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Poet Trumbull Stickney 1874–1904

Subjects Living, Disappointment & Failure, Summer, Landscapes & Pastorals, Nature

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 Trumbull  Stickney

Biography

Trumbull Stickney is best remembered as a promising young poet and scholar who died before his work could fully mature. As William Payne described his poems in a 1906 review for Dial: "Promise rather than fulfillment is the mark of this work as a whole, for it reveals Stickney as still groping for a distinctive manner rather than as having reached a definitive expression of his powers." A brilliant scholar and enthusiastic poet, . . .

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SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure, Summer, Landscapes & Pastorals, Nature

Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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