The Donkey

By G. K. Chesterton 1874–1936
When fishes flew and forests walked   
   And figs grew upon thorn,   
Some moment when the moon was blood   
   Then surely I was born.

With monstrous head and sickening cry
   And ears like errant wings,   
The devil’s walking parody   
   On all four-footed things.

The tattered outlaw of the earth,
   Of ancient crooked will;
Starve, scourge, deride me: I am dumb,   
   I keep my secret still.

Fools! For I also had my hour;
   One far fierce hour and sweet:   
There was a shout about my ears,
   And palms before my feet.

Source: The Collected Poems of G. K. Chesterton (Dodd Mead & Company, 1927)

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Poet G. K. Chesterton 1874–1936

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Georgian

Subjects Religion, Relationships, Pets, Christianity

Poetic Terms Common Measure

 G. K. Chesterton

Biography

G. K. Chesterton was one of the dominating figures of the London literary scene in the early twentieth century. Not only did he get into lively discussions with anyone who would debate him, including his friend, frequent verbal sparring partner, and noted Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, but he wrote about seemingly every topic, in every genre, from journalism to plays, poetry to crime novels. "He said something about . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Religion, Relationships, Pets, Christianity

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Georgian

Poetic Terms Common Measure

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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