Fawn

By Mary Barnard 1909–2001 Mary Barnard
Out of a high meadow where flowers   
bloom above cloud, come down;
pursue me with reasons for smiling without malice.

Bring mimic pride like that of the seedling fir,   
surprise in the perfect leg-stems
and queries unstirred by recognition or fear   
pooled in the deep eyes.

Come down by regions where rocks   
lift through the hot haze of pain;   
down landscapes darkened, crossed   
by the rift of death-shock; place print   
of a neat hoof on trampled ground   
where not one leaf or root
remains unbitten; but come down   
always, accompany me to the morass   
of the decaying mind. There
we’ll share one rotted stump between us.

Mary Barnard, “Fawn” from Collected Poems (Portland: Breitenbush, 1979). Used by permission of the Estate of Mary Barnard.

Source: The Collected Poems of Mary Barnard (Breitenbush, 1979)

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Poet Mary Barnard 1909–2001

Subjects Nature, Relationships, Trees & Flowers, Landscapes & Pastorals, Animals

Poetic Terms Free Verse

 Mary  Barnard

Biography

Mary Barnard was born in Vancouver, Washington and attended Reed College where she received her bachelor’s degree in 1932. Her works include A Few Poems (1952), The Mythmakers (1966), Three Fables (1975) and Nantucket Genesis: The Tale of My Tribe (1988). She was awarded Poetry Magazine’s Levinson Award in 1935, the Elliston award for her book Collected Poems (1979), the Western States Book Award in 1986 for her book Time and . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Relationships, Trees & Flowers, Landscapes & Pastorals, Animals

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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