Romance

By Edgar Allan Poe 1809–1849 Edgar Allan Poe
Romance, who loves to nod and sing,
With drowsy head and folded wing,
Among the green leaves as they shake
Far down within some shadowy lake,
To me a painted paroquet
Hath been—a most familiar bird—
Taught me my alphabet to say—
To lisp my very earliest word
While in the wild wood I did lie,
A child—with a most knowing eye.
Of late, eternal Condor years
So shake the very Heaven on high
With tumult as they thunder by,
I have no time for idle cares
Through gazing on the unquiet sky.
And when an hour with calmer wings
Its down upon my spirit flings—
That little time with lyre and rhyme
To while away—forbidden things!
My heart would feel to be a crime
Unless it trembled with the strings.

Source: The Complete Poems and Stories of Edgar Allan Poe (1946)

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Poet Edgar Allan Poe 1809–1849

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Nature, Landscapes & Pastorals

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Mixed

 Edgar  Allan Poe

Biography

Poe’s stature as a major figure in world literature is primarily based on his ingenious and profound short stories, poems, and critical theories, which established a highly influential rationale for the short form in both poetry and fiction. Regarded in literary histories and handbooks as the architect of the modern short story, Poe was also the principal forerunner of the “art for art’s sake” movement in nineteenth-century . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Landscapes & Pastorals

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Mixed

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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