Moss

By Bruce Guernsey Bruce Guernsey
How must it be
to be moss,
that slipcover of rocks?—
imagine,

greening in the dark,
longing for north,
the silence
of birds gone south.

How does moss do it,
all day
in a dank place
and never a cough?—

a wet dust
where light fails,
where the chisel
cut the name.

Reprinted from Peripheral Vision, published by Small Poetry Press, Pleasant Hill, CA. Copyright © 1997 by Bruce Guernsey and reprinted by permission of the author, whose latest book is “The Lost Brigade,” Water Press and Media, 2005.

Source: Peripheral Vision (Small Poetry Press, 1997)

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Poet Bruce Guernsey

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

Subjects Nature, Living, Death

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Metaphor

Biography

Poet, teacher, and editor, Bruce Guernsey graduated from Colgate University 1966. He later earned MAs from the University of Virginia and The John Hopkins University and a PhD from the University of New Hampshire.
 
Bruce Guernsey’s quiet, observant poems draw vividly upon the nature of his surroundings in the Northeast—and later Midwest—United States. In an interview with poet Diane Lockward, Guernsey notes how the move from . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Living, Death

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Metaphor

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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