New Stanzas for Amazing Grace

By Allen Ginsberg 1926–1997 Allen Ginsberg
I dreamed I dwelled in a homeless place
Where I was lost alone
Folk looked right through me into space
And passed with eyes of stone

O homeless hand on many a street
Accept this change from me
A friendly smile or word is sweet
As fearless charity

Woe workingman who hears the cry
And cannot spare a dime
Nor look into a homeless eye
Afraid to give the time

So rich or poor no gold to talk
A smile on your face
The homeless ones where you may walk
Receive amazing grace

I dreamed I dwelled in a homeless place
Where I was lost alone
Folk looked right through me into space
And passed with eyes of stone

April 2, 1994

Composed at the request of Ed Sanders for his production of The New Amazing
Grace, performed November 20, 1994, at the Poetry Project in St. Marks Church
in-the-Bouwerie

Allen Ginsberg. “New Stanzas for Amazing Grace” from Death & Fame: Last Poems 1993-1997, by Allen Ginsberg. Copyright © 1999 by The Allen Ginsberg Trust, and used by permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

Source: Death & Fame: Last Poems 1993-1997 (HarperCollins Publishers Inc, 1999)

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Poet Allen Ginsberg 1926–1997

SCHOOL / PERIOD Beat

Subjects Religion, Music, Class, Arts & Sciences, Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries, God & the Divine

Poetic Terms Common Measure

 Allen  Ginsberg

Biography

One of the most respected Beat writers and acclaimed American poets of his generation, Allen Ginsberg enjoys a prominent place in post-World War II American culture. He was born in 1926 in Newark, New Jersey, and raised in nearby Paterson. The son of an English teacher and Russian expatriate, Ginsberg’s early life was marked by his mother’s psychological troubles, including a series of nervous breakdowns. In 1943, while studying . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Religion, Music, Class, Arts & Sciences, Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries, God & the Divine

SCHOOL / PERIOD Beat

Poetic Terms Common Measure

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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