To -

By John Keats 1795–1821 John Keats
Had I a man’s fair form, then might my sighs
   Be echoed swiftly through that ivory shell
   Thine ear, and find thy gentle heart; so well
   Would passion arm me for the enterprise;
   But ah! I am no knight whose foeman dies;
   No cuirass glistens on my bosom’s swell;
   I am no happy shepherd of the dell
   Whose lips have trembled with a maiden’s eyes.
   Yet must I dote upon thee—call thee sweet,
   Sweeter by far than Hybla’s honied roses
   When steep’d in dew rich to intoxication.
   Ah! I will taste that dew, for me ‘tis meet,
   And when the moon her pallid face discloses,
   I’ll gather some by spells, and incantation.


Discover this poem’s context and related poetry, articles, and media.

Poet John Keats 1795–1821

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects Love, Romantic Love, Classic Love, Desire, Infatuation & Crushes

 John  Keats

Biography

John Keats, who died at the age of twenty-five, had perhaps the most remarkable career of any English poet. He published only fifty-four poems, in three slim volumes and a few magazines. But at each point in his development he took on the challenges of a wide range of poetic forms from the sonnet, to the Spenserian romance, to the Miltonic epic, defining anew their possibilities with his own distinctive fusion of earnest energy, . . .

Continue reading this biography

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Love, Romantic Love, Classic Love, Desire, Infatuation & Crushes

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Report a problem with this poem

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

This poem has related video.

This poem has related audio.