from Hero and Leander: "It lies not in our power to love or hate"

By Christopher Marlowe 1564–1593 Christopher Marlowe
It lies not in our power to love or hate,
For will in us is overruled by fate.
When two are stripped, long ere the course begin,
We wish that one should lose, the other win;
And one especially do we affect
Of two gold ingots, like in each respect:
The reason no man knows; let it suffice
What we behold is censured by our eyes.
Where both deliberate, the love is slight:
Who ever loved, that loved not at first sight?

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Poet Christopher Marlowe 1564–1593

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Renaissance

Subjects Love, Romantic Love, Classic Love, Infatuation & Crushes

 Christopher  Marlowe

Biography

The achievement of Christopher Marlowe, poet and dramatist, was enormous—surpassed only by that of his exact contemporary, Shakespeare. A few months the elder, Marlowe was usually the leader, although Shakespeare was able to bring his art to a higher perfection. Most dramatic poets of the sixteenth century followed where Marlowe had led, especially in their use of language and the blank-verse line. The prologue to Marlowe's . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Love, Romantic Love, Classic Love, Infatuation & Crushes

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Renaissance

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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