The Mock Song

By John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester 1647–1680 John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester
I swive as well as others do,
I’m young, not yet deformed,
My tender heart, sincere, and true,
Deserves not to be scorned.

Why Phyllis then, why will you swive,
With forty lovers more?
Can I (said she) with Nature strive,
Alas I am, alas I am a whore.

Were all my body larded o’er,
With darts of love, so thick,
That you might find in ev’ry pore,
A well stuck standing prick;

Whilst yet my eyes alone were free,
My heart, would never doubt,
In am’rous rage, and ecstasy,
To wish those eyes, to wish those eyes fucked out.

Discover this poem’s context and related poetry, articles, and media.

Poet John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester 1647–1680

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Subjects Love, Desire

Biography

John Wilmot, second Earl of Rochester and Baron of Adderbury in England, Viscount Athlone in Ireland, infamous in his time for his life and works and admired for his deathbed performance, was the cynosure of the libertine wits of Restoration England. He was anathematized as evil incarnate and simultaneously adored for his seraphic presence, beauty, and wit, even from his first appearance at the court of Charles II. This . . .

Continue reading this biography

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Love, Desire

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Report a problem with this poem

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

This poem has related video.

This poem has related audio.