White Heliotrope

By Arthur Symons 1865–1945 Arthur Symons
The feverish room and that white bed,
The tumbled skirts upon a chair,   
The novel flung half-open, where
Hat, hair-pins, puffs, and paints are spread;

The mirror that has sucked your face
Into its secret deep of deeps,
And there mysteriously keeps
Forgotten memories of grace;

And you half dressed and half awake,
Your slant eyes strangely watching me,
And I, who watch you drowsily,
With eyes that, having slept not, ache;

This (need one dread? nay, dare one hope?)
Will rise, a ghost of memory, if
Ever again my handkerchief
Is scented with White Heliotrope.

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Poet Arthur Symons 1865–1945

POET’S REGION England

Subjects Living, Time & Brevity, Relationships, Men & Women, Love, Desire, Romantic Love, Heartache & Loss

Poetic Terms Symbolist

 Arthur  Symons

Biography

British poet, critic, and translator Arthur Symons was born in Wales and educated by private tutors. At 16, Symons moved to London, where he joined a vibrant literary community and participated, alongside poets like William Butler Yeats, in the notorious Rhymers’ Club, a group of poets and writers responsible for witty repartee anthologies such as The Book of the Rhymers’ Club (1892), in which Symons’s poems appeared.

Symons’s . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Time & Brevity, Relationships, Men & Women, Love, Desire, Romantic Love, Heartache & Loss

POET’S REGION England

Poetic Terms Symbolist

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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