Love and Friendship

By Emily Brontë 1818–1848 Emily Bronte
Love is like the wild rose-briar,
Friendship like the holly-tree—
The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms
But which will bloom most constantly?

The wild rose-briar is sweet in spring,
Its summer blossoms scent the air;
Yet wait till winter comes again
And who will call the wild-briar fair?

Then scorn the silly rose-wreath now
And deck thee with the holly’s sheen,
That when December blights thy brow
He still may leave thy garland green.

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Poet Emily Brontë 1818–1848

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Love, Break-ups & Vexed Love, Realistic & Complicated

 Emily   Brontë

Biography

The only poems by Emily Brontë that were published in her lifetime were included in a slim volume by Brontë and her sisters Charlotte and Anne titled Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell (1846), which sold a mere two copies and received only three unsigned reviews in the months following its publication. The three notices were positive, however, especially with respect to the contributions of Ellis Bell—Emily Brontë. The . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Love, Break-ups & Vexed Love, Realistic & Complicated

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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