Sonnet II: Of thee, kind boy, I ask no red and white

By Sir John Suckling 1609–1642 Sir John Suckling
Of thee, kind boy, I ask no red and white,
    To make up my delight;
    No odd becoming graces,
Black eyes, or little know-not-whats in faces;
Make me but mad enough, give me good store
Of love for her I count;
    I ask no more,
’Tis love in love that makes the sport.

There’s no such thing as that we beauty call,
    It is mere cozenage all;
    For though some, long ago,
Liked certain colors mingled so and so,
That doth not tie me now from choosing new;
If I a fancy take
    To black and blue,
That fancy doth it beauty make.

’Tis not the meat, but ’tis the appetite
    Makes eating a delight;
    And if I like one dish
More than another, that a pheasant is;
What in our watches, that in us is found:
So to the height and nick
    We up be wound,
No matter by what hand or trick.

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Poet Sir John Suckling 1609–1642

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Subjects Relationships, Love, Activities, Eating & Drinking

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Sonnet

 Sir John  Suckling

Biography

A popular label for many poets in seventeenth-century Britain has been "Cavalier," and the person who usually comes first to mind is Sir John Suckling. The classification implies an allegiance to Charles I in his political and military battles against various Parliamentarian or religious groups during the later 1620s through his execution on 30 January 1649. Included thus are the poets Thomas Carew, Richard Lovelace, Suckling, . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Love, Activities, Eating & Drinking

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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