from War is Kind [“I explain the silvered passing of a ship at night”]

By Stephen Crane 1871–1900 Stephen Crane
I explain the silvered passing of a ship at night
The sweep of each sad lost wave
The dwindling boom of the steel thing's striving
The little cry of a man to a man
A shadow falling across the greyer night
And the sinking of the small star.

Then the waste, the far waste of waters
And the soft lashing of black waves
For long and in loneliness.

Remember, thou, oh ship of love
Thou leavest a far waste of waters
And the soft lashing of black waves
For long and in loneliness.

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Poet Stephen Crane 1871–1900

Subjects Activities, Travels & Journeys, Nature, Seas, Rivers, & Streams, Social Commentaries, War & Conflict

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Imagery

 Stephen  Crane

Biography

Stephen Crane was one of America's foremost realistic writers, and his works have been credited with marking the beginning of modern American Naturalism. His Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage (1895) is a classic of American literature that realistically depicts the psychological complexities of fear and courage on the battlefield. Influenced by William Dean Howells's theory of realism, Crane utilized his keen . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Activities, Travels & Journeys, Nature, Seas, Rivers, & Streams, Social Commentaries, War & Conflict

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Imagery

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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