Before I got my eye put out – (336)

By Emily Dickinson 1830–1886 Emily Dickinson
Before I got my eye put out –
I liked as well to see
As other creatures, that have eyes –
And know no other way –

But were it told to me, Today,
That I might have the Sky
For mine, I tell you that my Heart
Would split, for size of me –

The Meadows – mine –
The Mountains – mine –
All Forests – Stintless stars –
As much of noon, as I could take –
Between my finite eyes –

The Motions of the Dipping Birds –
The Morning’s Amber Road –
For mine – to look at when I liked,
The news would strike me dead –

So safer – guess – with just my soul
Opon the window pane
Where other creatures put their eyes –
Incautious – of the Sun –

Source: The Poems of Emily Dickinson Edited by R. W. Franklin (Harvard University Press, 1999)

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Poet Emily Dickinson 1830–1886

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Nature, Health & Illness, Living, The Body

 Emily  Dickinson

Biography

A poet who took definition as her province, Emily Dickinson challenged the existing definitions of poetry and the poet’s work. Like writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman, she experimented with expression in order to free it from conventional restraints. Like writers such as Charlotte Brontë and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, she crafted a new type of persona for the first person. The speakers in . . .

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Poems by Emily Dickinson

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Health & Illness, Living, The Body

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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