Reluctance

By Robert Frost 1874–1963 Robert Frost
Out through the fields and the woods
   And over the walls I have wended;
I have climbed the hills of view
   And looked at the world, and descended;
I have come by the highway home,
   And lo, it is ended.
 
The leaves are all dead on the ground,
   Save those that the oak is keeping
To ravel them one by one
   And let them go scraping and creeping
Out over the crusted snow,
   When others are sleeping.
 
And the dead leaves lie huddled and still,
   No longer blown hither and thither;
The last lone aster is gone;
   The flowers of the witch hazel wither;
The heart is still aching to seek,
   But the feet question ‘Whither?’
 
Ah, when to the heart of man
   Was it ever less than a treason
To go with the drift of things,
   To yield with a grace to reason,
And bow and accept the end
   Of a love or a season?

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Poet Robert Frost 1874–1963

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Relationships, Love, Men & Women, Nature, Winter, Heartache & Loss

 Robert  Frost

Biography

Robert Frost holds a unique and almost isolated position in American letters. “Though his career fully spans the modern period and though it is impossible to speak of him as anything other than a modern poet,” writes James M. Cox, “it is difficult to place him in the main tradition of modern poetry.” In a sense, Frost stands at the crossroads of 19th-century American poetry and modernism, for in his verse may be found the . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Love, Men & Women, Nature, Winter, Heartache & Loss

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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