XXI 

By Michael Field Michael Field

Βροδοπαχεες αγναι Χαριτες, δεντε Λιος κοραι

 
Ye rosy-armed, pure Graces, come,
    Daughters of Zeus, be near!
Oh, wherefore have my lips been dumb
    So long in silence drear?
And why have I so cheerless been,
    So sorrowful and wild?
It was because ye were not seen,
    Because ye had not smiled.
Although his prayer the Muses bless,
    The poet doth require
That ye, in frolic gentleness,
    Should stand beside his lyre.
Ne’er will he mortal ear delight,
     Nor care-vex’d spirit ease;
Except he sing with ye in sight,
    Rose-flushed among the trees.

Source: Long Ago (Thomas B. Mosher, 1897)

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Poet Michael Field

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Mythology & Folklore, Greek & Roman Mythology

Biography

Under the pseudonym Michael Field, Katherine Harris Bradley and her niece Edith Emma Cooper collaboratively published eight books of poetry and twenty-seven plays in late 19th-century Britain. The two women enjoyed a warm reception as Field in Victorian literary circles upon the release of their first major verse drama, Callirhoë and Fair Rosamond (1884), even garnering the admiration of Walter Pater, George Meredith, and Robert . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Mythology & Folklore, Greek & Roman Mythology

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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