Topsy-Turvy World

By William Brighty Rands William Brighty Rands
 
IF the butterfly courted the bee,    
  And the owl the porcupine;    
If churches were built in the sea,    
  And three times one was nine;    
If the pony rode his master,          
  If the buttercups ate the cows,    
If the cats had the dire disaster    
  To be worried, sir, by the mouse;    
If mamma, sir, sold the baby    
  To a gypsy for half a crown;         
If a gentleman, sir, was a lady,—    
  The world would be Upside-down!    
If any or all of these wonders    
  Should ever come about,    
I should not consider them blunders,          
  For I should be Inside-out!    
 
            Chorus

Ba-ba, black wool,    
  Have you any sheep?    
Yes, sir, a packfull,    
  Creep, mouse, creep!         
Four-and-twenty little maids    
  Hanging out the pie,    
Out jump’d the honey-pot,    
  Guy Fawkes, Guy!    
Cross latch, cross latch,      
  Sit and spin the fire;    
When the pie was open’d,    
  The bird was on the brier!

Source:  A Victorian Anthology 1837–1895 ()

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Poet William Brighty Rands

Subjects Relationships, Family & Ancestors, Pets, Nature, Animals

Poetic Terms Refrain, Rhymed Stanza

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Family & Ancestors, Pets, Nature, Animals

Poetic Terms Refrain, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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