The Matrix

By Amy Lowell 1874–1925 Amy Lowell
Goaded and harassed in the factory
   That tears our life up into bits of days
   Ticked off upon a clock which never stays,
Shredding our portion of Eternity,
We break away at last, and steal the key
   Which hides a world empty of hours; ways
   Of space unroll, and Heaven overlays
The leafy, sun-lit earth of Fantasy.
   Beyond the ilex shadow glares the sun,
   Scorching against the blue flame of the sky.
Brown lily-pads lie heavy and supine
   Within a granite basin, under one
   The bronze-gold glimmer of a carp; and I
Reach out my hand and pluck a nectarine.

Source: A Dome of Many-Coloured Glass (1912)

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Poet Amy Lowell 1874–1925

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Imagist

Subjects Living, Time & Brevity, Activities, Jobs & Working, Social Commentaries

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Sonnet, Imagist

 Amy  Lowell

Biography

An oft-quoted remark attributed to poet Amy Lowell applies to both her determined personality and her sense of humor: "God made me a business woman," Lowell is reported to have quipped, "and I made myself a poet." During a career that spanned just over a dozen years, she wrote and published over 650 poems, yet scholars cite Lowell's tireless efforts to awaken American readers to contemporary trends in poetry as her more . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Time & Brevity, Activities, Jobs & Working, Social Commentaries

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Imagist

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza, Sonnet, Imagist

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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