Edges

By Allen Tate 1899–1979 Allen Tate
I’ve often wondered why she laughed
On thinking why I wondered so;
It seemed such waste that long white hands
Should touch my hands and let them go.
 
And once when we were parting there,
Unseen of anything but trees,
I touched her fingers, thoughtfully,
For more than simple niceties.
 
But for some futile things unsaid
I should say all is done for us;
Yet I have wondered how she smiled
Beholding what was cavernous.

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Poet Allen Tate 1899–1979

POET’S REGION U.S., Southern

SCHOOL / PERIOD Fugitive

Subjects Living, Separation & Divorce, Relationships, Love, Nature, The Body

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Allen  Tate

Biography

Allen Tate was a well-known man of letters from the American South, a central figure in the fields of poetry, criticism, and ideas. In the course of a career spanning the middle decades of the twentieth century, Tate authored poems, essays, translations, and fiction. Dictionary of Literary Biography contributor James T. Jones wrote that his "influence was prodigious, his circle of acquaintances immense." Tate relished his "man . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Separation & Divorce, Relationships, Love, Nature, The Body

POET’S REGION U.S., Southern

SCHOOL / PERIOD Fugitive

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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