Indian River

By Wallace Stevens 1879–1955 Wallace Stevens
The trade-wind jingles the rings in the nets around the racks
        by the docks on Indian River.
It is the same jingle of the water among roots under the
        banks of the palmettoes.
It is the same jingle of the red-bird breasting the orange-trees
        out of the cedars.
Yet there is no spring in Florida, neither in boskage perdu, nor
       on the nunnery beaches.

Source: Soil (1917)

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Poet Wallace Stevens 1879–1955

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Subjects Nature, Spring, Landscapes & Pastorals, Seas, Rivers, & Streams, Arts & Sciences, Language & Linguistics

 Wallace  Stevens

Biography

Wallace Stevens is one of America's most respected poets. He was a master stylist, employing an extraordinary vocabulary and a rigorous precision in crafting his poems. But he was also a philosopher of aesthetics, vigorously exploring the notion of poetry as the supreme fusion of the creative imagination and objective reality. Because of the extreme technical and thematic complexity of his work, Stevens was sometimes considered . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Spring, Landscapes & Pastorals, Seas, Rivers, & Streams, Arts & Sciences, Language & Linguistics

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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