Rain

By Kazim Ali b. 1971 Kazim Ali
With thick strokes of ink the sky fills with rain.
Pretending to run for cover but secretly praying for more rain.

Over the echo of the water, I hear a voice saying my name.
No one in the city moves under the quick sightless rain.

The pages of my notebook soak, then curl. I’ve written:
“Yogis opened their mouths for hours to drink the rain.”

The sky is a bowl of dark water, rinsing your face.
The window trembles; liquid glass could shatter into rain.

I am a dark bowl, waiting to be filled.
If I open my mouth now, I could drown in the rain.

I hurry home as though someone is there waiting for me.
The night collapses into your skin. I am the rain.

Kazim Ali, "Rain" from The Far Mosque. Copyright © 2005 by Kazim Ali.  Reprinted by permission of Alice James Books.

Source: The Far Mosque (Alice James Books, 2005)

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Poet Kazim Ali b. 1971

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

Subjects Nature, Weather, Love, Desire, Unrequited Love, Break-ups & Vexed Love

Poetic Terms Ghazal

 Kazim  Ali

Biography

Poet, editor, and prose writer Kazim Ali was born in the United Kingdom to Muslim parents of Indian descent. He received a BA and MA from the University of Albany-SUNY, and an MFA from New York University. Ali’s poetry collections include The Far Mosque (2005), which won Alice James Books’ New England/New York Award, and The Fortieth Day (2008). Ali’s poems, both lyric and musical, explore the intersection of faith and daily . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Weather, Love, Desire, Unrequited Love, Break-ups & Vexed Love

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

Poetic Terms Ghazal

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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