April Snow

By Matthew Zapruder b. 1967 Matthew Zapruder
Today in El Paso all the planes are asleep on the runway. The world
is in a delay. All the political consultants drinking whiskey keep
their heads down, lifting them only to look at the beautiful scarred
waitress who wears typewriter keys as a necklace. They jingle
when she brings them drinks. Outside the giant plate glass windows
the planes are completely covered in snow, it piles up on the wings.
I feel like a mountain of cell phone chargers. Each of the various
faiths of our various fathers keeps us only partly protected. I don’t
want to talk on the phone to an angel. At night before I go to sleep
I am already dreaming. Of coffee, of ancient generals, of the faces
of statues each of which has the eternal expression of one of my feelings.
I examine my feelings without feeling anything. I ride my blue bike
on the edge of the desert. I am president of this glass of water.

Matthew Zapruder, “April Snow” from Come on All You Ghosts. Copyright © 2010 by Matthew Zapruder. Reprinted by permission of Copper Canyon Press.

Source: Come on All You Ghosts (Copper Canyon Press, 2010)

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Poet Matthew Zapruder b. 1967

POET’S REGION U.S., Western

Subjects Living, The Mind, Activities, Travels & Journeys, Nature, Spring, Landscapes & Pastorals, Weather, Social Commentaries

Poetic Terms Free Verse

 Matthew  Zapruder

Biography

Poet and editor Matthew Zapruder was born in Washington, DC. He earned a BA in Russian literature at Amherst College, an MA in Slavic languages and literature at the University of California, Berkeley, and an MFA in poetry at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.
 
Zapruder’s poems employ nuanced, conversational syntax to engage themes of grief, perception, and logic. As Dana Jennings noted in the New York Times, Zapruder . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, The Mind, Activities, Travels & Journeys, Nature, Spring, Landscapes & Pastorals, Weather, Social Commentaries

POET’S REGION U.S., Western

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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