End of Summer

By Stanley Kunitz 1905–2006 Stanley Kunitz
An agitation of the air,
A perturbation of the light
Admonished me the unloved year
Would turn on its hinge that night.
 
I stood in the disenchanted field
Amid the stubble and the stones,
Amazed, while a small worm lisped to me
The song of my marrow-bones.
 
Blue poured into summer blue,
A hawk broke from his cloudless tower,
The roof of the silo blazed, and I knew
That part of my life was over.
 
Already the iron door of the north
Clangs open: birds, leaves, snows
Order their populations forth,
And a cruel wind blows.

Stanley Kunitz, "End of Summer" from The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz. Copyright © 1953 by Stanley Kunitz.  Reprinted by permission of W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Source: The Collected Poems of Stanley Kunitz (W. W. Norton and Company, Inc., 2002)

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Poet Stanley Kunitz 1905–2006

Subjects Living, Coming of Age, Time & Brevity, Nature, Fall

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Stanley  Kunitz

Biography

Stanley Kunitz became the tenth Poet Laureate of the United States in the autumn of 2000. Kunitz was ninety-five years old at the time, still actively publishing and promoting poetry to new generations of readers. In the New York Times Book Review, Robert Campbell noted that Kunitz's selection as poet laureate—the highest literary honor in America—"affirms his stature as perhaps the most distinguished living American poet." . . .

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SUBJECT Living, Coming of Age, Time & Brevity, Nature, Fall

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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