The Sorrow of True Love 

By Edward Thomas 1878–1917 Edward Thomas
The sorrow of true love is a great sorrow
And true love parting blackens a bright morrow:
Yet almost they equal joys, since their despair
Is but hope blinded by its tears, and clear
Above the storm the heavens wait to be seen.
But greater sorrow from less love has been
That can mistake lack of despair for hope
And knows not tempest and the perfect scope
Of summer, but a frozen drizzle perpetual
Of drops that from remorse and pity fall
And cannot ever shine in the sun or thaw,
Removed eternally from the sun’s law.


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Poet Edward Thomas 1878–1917

POET’S REGION England

Subjects Living, Disappointment & Failure, Love, Classic Love, Heartache & Loss, Nature, Weather

 Edward  Thomas

Biography

Such prominent critics and authors as Walter de la Mare, Aldous Huxley, Peter SacksSeamus Heaney, and Edna Longley have called Edward Thomas one of England's most important poets. Since 2000, much serious consideration has been given to Thomas's work. Most critics would agree with Andrew Motion, who states that Thomas occupies "a crucial place in the development of twentieth-century poetry" for introducing a modern . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure, Love, Classic Love, Heartache & Loss, Nature, Weather

POET’S REGION England

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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